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lupus and people with rh- factor.

hi. my name is christina and i have sle. i also have the rh factor. ive tried studying what little there is on the relationship between the rh factor and lupus. so i just keep looking for people who also have this in common. hope all are coping as well as they can.
c

Replies

deleted_user
deleted_user

What is the rh-factor???Brenda
deleted_user
deleted_user

Most of us are Rh (+) so I doubt there is an association...is that what you mean Rh factor?
Dr O.
Lynr
Lynr

I read a post before about this or maybe it was about blood type? anyways.... as a matter of fact, i'm pretty sure it was about blood type, specifically the B type. I have B with the RH - if you want to add that to your data.
Lyn
deleted_user
deleted_user

I have discoid, and sle, and have A- blood type, Tish
deleted_user
deleted_user

I have done blood banking for over 15 years. The number of Rh pos and Rh neg peolple with lupus is the same as the general population.
Rh pos people simply have a protien on the red cell wall that the Rh neg people do not have. The importance of it is you cannot give some one with Rh neg blood red cells from a donor with Rh pos blood it causes a transfution reaction that could be fatal. Rh neg Moms need to have a Rhogam shot after giving birth to Rh pos babies so that thier bodies will not reject the NEXT fetus they carry IF it to is Rh positive.
UNLESS what your are calling rh factor is in fact rheumatoid factor in which case your looking for arthritis. People with lupus have a high rate of false positive test for RF. Deb
deleted_user
deleted_user

thank you deborah for explaining the rh- factor. well done.
deleted_user
deleted_user

The Rh factor is the rhumatric factor... rhumetoid arthric...if i remember correctly
deleted_user
deleted_user

Hi Christina,
I am RH O Negative, and was dx with SLE in 1995. I have two children (1973 & 1974) and had to have Rhogam injections after the first two, and during a bleeding episode when I was 8 wks. pregnant with my third child(1989). Interesting, I've read that years ago...the Rhogam Injection had mercury preservatives in it. My third child was born with developmental delays, mild mental retardation, etc. After I had the bleeding, I prepared myself for possible problems with my third child.
I do believe that the RH negative factor has some role in SLE. My grandmother was RH O neg., and also had difficulties with misscarraiges. I wish there was more money directed to lupus research.
Donna
deleted_user
deleted_user

The RH factor is from the rheuses monkey from which it was first found.
I am RH with O negative. I have also wondered if there is a connection between this and lupus. It's impossible to find answers anywhere. My youngest daughter also has the RH factor and has been diagnosed with hashimoto's and lupus.
There has to be a connection somewhere, I think, but can't prove. I'm going to check with my Dr at my next visit. He probably won't know either.
deleted_user
deleted_user

Rh factor
The Rh factor is an antigen (a protein) that is found on the surface of the red blood cell. Along with the A and B antigens it comprises the major scheme we use for "typing" or classifying human blood for compatibility for transfusion.

The term "Rh factor" is short for Rhesus factor. It seems we share this antigen with our relatives in the primate world, the rhesus monkeys.

The antigen is either there, or it is not. This is determined by the presence or absence of a single gene. We can test for the presence of the antigen by adding artificially produced antibodies to a mixture of the patient's red cells. If they form clumps, we know that the antibody is present on the red cells. We term this blood Rh positive. If the antigen is not present (and the cells don't clump), we designate the blood type as Rh negative.

Each person's blood is one of four major types: A, B, AB, or O. Blood types are determined by the types of antigens on the blood cells. Antigens are proteins on the surface of blood cells that can cause a response from the immune system. The Rh factor is a type of protein on the surface of red blood cells. Most people who have the Rh factor are Rh-positive. Those who do not have the Rh factor are Rh-negative.

How do I know if I am Rh-negative or Rh-positive?
As part of your prenatal care, you will have blood tests to find out your blood type. If your blood lacks the Rh antigen, it is called Rh-negative. If it has the antigen, it is called Rh-positive.

When the mother is Rh-negative and the father is Rh-positive, the fetus can inherit the Rh factor from the father. This makes the fetus Rh-positive too. Problems can arise when the fetus's blood has the Rh factor and the mother's blood does not.

What may happen if I am Rh-negative and pregnant?
If you are Rh-negative, you may develop antibodies to an Rh-positive baby. If a small amount of the baby's blood mixes with your blood, which often happens, your body may respond as if it were allergic to the baby. Your body may make antibodies to the Rh antigens in the baby's blood. This means you have become sensitized and your antibodies can cross the placenta and attack your baby's blood. They break down the fetus's red blood cells and produce anemia (the blood has a low number of red blood cells). This condition is called hemolytic disease or hemolytic anemia. It can become severe enough to cause serious illness, brain damage, or even death in the fetus or newborn.

another source addition: Most people have Rh-positive blood, meaning that they produce the "Rh factor," an inherited protein found on the surface of their red blood cells. But about 15 percent of the white population and 7 percent of the African-American population lack the Rh factor. These people are Rh-negative.
The health of an Rh-negative person is not affected in any way. However, an Rh-negative woman is at risk of having a baby with Rh disease if she conceives a baby with an Rh-positive father and the baby inherits the father's Rh-positive blood type.
What is Rh disease?
Rh disease is a condition caused by an incompatibility between the blood of a mother and that of her fetus. If the mother is Rh-negative and her baby is Rh-positive, during pregnancy (and especially during labor and delivery) some of the fetus's Rh-positive red blood cells may get into the mother's bloodstream. Since these red blood cells are foreign to the mother's system, her body will try to fight them off by producing antibodies against them a process called "sensitization."
In a first pregnancy, there's very little danger to an Rh-positive baby because the child is usually born before the mother produces substantial Rh antibodies. However, since the woman will continue to produce antibodies throughout her life, during her next pregnancy, maternal Rh antibodies can cross the placenta and reach the fetus.
This is a disease that destroys an unborn baby's blood cells, potentially resulting in newborns being born with jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes) and anemia. In some cases the results could be brain damage, heart failure, and even death. But today, doctors are able to detect and treat Rh disease in the fetus, so about 95 percent of babies with severe Rh disease survive.
How common is Rh disease?
While the disease once affected 20,000 babies in the U.S. each year, fortunately it's rare today. Since 1968, a treatment that prevents Rh disease (injections of a blood product called Rh immunoglobulin) has dramatically reduced the number of babies born with it.
But not all women who need the treatment get it, and a small number of women can't be helped by the injections. As a result, some 4,000 babies still develop Rh disease each year. The good news is that the disease can be treated, and doctors are now able to manage it earlier than ever before, often even before birth. And in some cases Rh disease is so mild that it doesn't require treatment.



I am RH negative. Because our bodies react as if we're allergic to our RH positive babies, it seems to react the same way Lupus does to our own organs. This is the reason I am wondering if there is a common factor with RH negative and lupus.
slamber5769
slamber5769

My mom was rh positive and I was rh negative. When I was born I had no platelets in my blood and my I had a full blood transfusion. I have a scar on my scalp from that. When I was 11 I was diagnosed with sle lupus. I treat my lupus holistically by taking vitamins and eating right. You should be on a gluten free or low gluten diet.
mirandagarcia
mirandagarcia

I am AB- and I to have wondered if that had some correlation to this, the truth is they know so little I think every aspect should be taken into account.
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