FIFTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS - SIX signs that you are middle class

FIFTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS
SIX SIGNS THAT YOU ARE MIDDLE CLASS
1.  Automobile OwnershipOwning an automobile provides freedom of movement and the luxury of avoiding the limited schedules and cramped quarters offered by mass transportation options such as buses and subways. Here again, the cost of cars varying widely, as does the kind of automobile required.   For one driver, a used Hyundai will do the trick.   For another, a new BMW signifies the achievement of this goal.
2.  VacationingVacation is a middle class staple.   Vacations demonstrate that there is disposable income and has been successful enough to take time away to focus on leisure.
3.  College Education Paying for a college education for yourself and/or for your children can cost anywhere from the low tens of thousands of dollars to hundreds of thousands.  You don't go to college to get a job, you go to college to "understand the world" or know your enemy well.  All of the psychology and sociology classes are taught in college, the inside "scoop" about just about everything is taught in college and only in college.  Why go through life blind?  Why make it tough when its easy?  You want to know something, take a class in it.
4.  Health Care CoverageThe ability to obtain healthcare is an important goal for middle class earners.   The high and rising cost of medical care and prescription drugs make healthcare coverage an ever-increasing need, however, socialized medical care would take care of this. 
5.  Retirement SecurityRetirement demonstrates success and provides a reward for decades of work.   Once again, definitions make a difference.   The amount of gold required to support your golden years (IF you ever reach those years) will vary significantly depending on whether you want a villa in the South of France or a townhouse in South Carolina.
6.  Home OwnershipHome ownership or even "land" ownership, used to be the #1 goal of all people graduating from high school.  First the car and then a piece of land, house, co-op, somewhere to put your stuff, whether a cheap weekend place or a house in a city.   However, during today's fiscal crisas, experts claim its cheaper and less risky to rent.   In decades past, it was considered a step up - going from renting to owning.  Owning a home signified prosperity and achievement, or even better, owning investment properties or an apartment building.  
Home prices differ by so much in different cities across the United States, a large home in one state may cost ten times as much FOR THE SAME HOUSE in another state, because the land in the other state is so expensive (not the house).  The ability to achieve the home ownership goal varies significantly by geographical location.  A good rule of thumb is to drive 30 miles "out" from the major city area where you work, and you should be able to find MANY good deals, and still be able to commute just as quickly  if the home is right off of a highway. 
Someone earning an income in the 50% range in Georgia may not be able to afford even a small house in California.  But if they MOVE to California their income will increase and then they CAN afford something there, but do you want the permanent stress of paying higher taxes in a state like California as well?     
 

Replies

DarlaC
DarlaC

Yep, another \"I need to ponder this\" informational journal! Love these! Gets the juices goin in ma brain!!!!
deleted_user
deleted_user

Enjoyed your journal as always. I see that more families are now staying together too, like Mom and Pop are in the same or adjacent space. A larger family type. Financially, kids are staying closer as well. I think this is a much better type of lifestyle myself. XXOO
38lbs
38lbs

probably is, lee, as long as the families get along well...disfunctionals should never live that way at all. the answer for disfunctionals is as much distance as possible and no return at all, even better. if it doesn\'t work, it doesn\'t work. doesn\'t matter why either. just let it die and move on, you only live once.

in europe families always live near each other. the most fascinating thing of study abroad was hanging out with people from the university. they knew their cousins. they lived near each other. they hung out together. they saw each other at festivals and at each other\'s homes. it was very cool the way they live. no idea if they care for the elderly though. i know in nursing 101 they claimed that only orientals and some (not all) spanish cultures care for their elderly at their own homes, other cultures don\'t do that. the bit with kids returning to the nest even after the age of 23, i think is a new thing. kids returning for a month or two to save up and get back on track has always existed, but kids returning for a number of years and possibly permanently, is definitely a new thing. makes you wonder what went wrong there.
carlyj1202
carlyj1202

A very interesting post. Some I agree with........some not. But it does get you thinking.

xoxo
LivingWater
LivingWater

Thanks! That was quite informative, fascinating, and witty. It is claimed we are LOSING our middle class in America. A wide gulf exists between the rich and the poor (recently middle class poor). As for the Asian and Spanish cultures caring for their elderly, the German culture taught that value also. My sister cared for both Mom and Dad in her home. They both died there. We are of \"Pennsylvania Dutch\" stock.