Weight Watchers Ranked "best Weight-loss Diet" And "easiest Diet To Follow" By U.s. News & World R

News' panel of health experts, including nutritionists and physicians specializing in diabetes, heart health and weight loss, scored each diet for short- and long-term weight loss, ease of compliance, safety and nutrition. Diets were ranked in eight categories, including diabetes and heart disease prevention and control, as well as easiness to follow and likelihood of weight loss. For more information about the rankings, visit Best Diets 2014. The repeated top rankings are consistent with the clinical evidence of the effectiveness of the Weight Watchers approach, which is based on more than 80 peer reviewed studies that establish the program's efficacy. "We're very proud to receive top recognition from a trusted resource such as U.S. News and World Report and it only furthers our desire to continue providing the 'best' and 'easiest' program out there," said Lesya Lysyj, President, North America, Weight Watchers. Click the following link to learn more on Weight Watchers Ranked "Best Weight-Loss Diet" And "Easiest Diet To Follow" By U.S. News & World Report.






Dr. Oz reveals 2-week diet for rapid weight-loss: It's here, healthy and easy





It does more harm to our body than anything else. Alcohol is out because it can cause you to over indulge. 4. Eliminate coffee: Coffee by itself is actually healthy, but its the sugar and cream we add to it are not good for you. Since coffee can also be a trigger for us to crave unhealthy items, this goes for the Dr. Oz two-week diet. Click the following link to learn more on Dr. Oz reveals 2-week diet for rapid weight-loss: It's here, healthy and easy.






Mediterranean diet staves off diabetes even without weight loss: study





In the Spanish study, people at risk for heart disease who followed a diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish, and fats from nuts or olive oil were about 30 percent less likely to develop diabetes over a four-year period than those who ate a low-fat diet. RELATED: MEDITERRANEAN DIET HELPS WOMEN LIVE LONGER, BETTER: STUDY The research was a subanalysis of last year's influential PREDIMED study, involving 7,447 subjects at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Researchers from Universidad de Navarra found that subjects who ate a Mediterranean diet had a 30 percent greater reduction in the risk of heart attack, stroke, or death from cardiovascular disease than those who ate a low-fat diet. The new paper, published this week in the Annals of Internal Medicine, looked at the development of diabetes among 3,541 subjects who didn't have diabetes at the beginning of the study. Even just adding olive oil to your diet resulted in a health boost, the study suggests. Participants who added fats from extra-virgin olive oil were 40 percent less likely to develop diabetes during the study

compared with those who followed a low-fat diet. Click the following link to learn more on Mediterranean diet staves off diabetes even without weight loss: study.