Study Says Colorectal Cancer Increasing In Young Adults

Overall incidence rates for colorectal cancer in the United States have been on the decline since the mid-1980s, with the drop accelerating in the most recent time period. Rates are now dropping 2.8 percent per year in men and 2.2 percent per year in women, largely due to an increase in screening, particularly colonoscopy , among individuals ages 50 years and older. Screening can reduce colorectal cancer incidence by detecting and removing polyps before they become cancerous. But recent incidence trends among adults younger than 50 years, for whom routine screening is not recommended, have not been analyzed thoroughly. A previous study did find an increase in incidence from 1973 to 1999 for all races combined, but that study did not include 40 to 49 year-olds, who represent 73 percent of colorectal cancer patients under age 50. In a new analysis, American Cancer Society researchers led by Rebecca L. Siegel, M.P.H., looked at trends in colorectal cancer incidence rates between 1992 and 2005 among young adults (ages 20 to 49) by sex, race/ethnicity, age, stage at diagnosis, and anatomic subsite. The study found that among individuals ages 20 to 49, incidence rates of colorectal cancer increased 1.5 percent per year in men and 1.6 percent per year in women from 1992 to 2005. Among non-Hispanic Whites, rates increased for both men and women in each 10-year age grouping (20-29, 30-39, and 40-49 years) and for every stage of diagnosis. They found the largest annual percent increase in colorectal cancer incidence was in the youngest age group (20-29 years), in whom incidence rates rose by 5.2% per year in men and 5.6% per year in women. They say the rises are due to an increase in left-sided tumors, particularly in the rectum. The researchers address several possibilities for the rise, including rising rates of obesity, which is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer. Dietary factors may also come into play. The researchers note that between the late 1970s and the mid-1990s, fast-food consumption in the United States increased 5-fold among children and 3-fold among adults. A diet high in fast food is associated with both greater meat consumption and reduced milk consumption. Increased consumption of red and processed meat has been shown to increase risk of cancers of the distal colon and rectum, while milk and calcium consumption have shown a protective effect against the subsites in which the rise in incidence was most prominent. have a peek here http://phys.org/news163644954.html







Heavy people more likely to have colon polyps: Study





Previous studies have made the connection between obesity and colon cancer, a link recognized by the US National Cancer Institute. But the current study, which appeared in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, is the first to point to a higher risk of colon polyps - also known as adenomas - in heavy people. "Because there is a known association between obesity and cancer, there is a logical extension to expect a connection between obesity and the step before cancer, which is adenoma,"said Hutan Ashrafian from Imperial College, London, who co-authored the study. Ashrafian and his colleagues analyzed data from 23 studies involving more than 100,000 people across the United States, Asia and Europe, looking at the relationship between polyps and body mass index, or BMI, a measure of weight relative to height. All the studies followed World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines that define people with a BMI over 25 as overweight and above 30 as obese. In most studies, polyps were identified during colonoscopy procedures while two large studies used self-reported questionnaires. Overall, researchers found that 22 per cent of overweight and obese people had colon polyps, compared to 19 per cent in people of normal weight. The polyp risk grew with increasing BMI. "The findings suggest that obesity may be having an effect (on cancer development) much earlier than we thought," said Ashrafian, who with his fellow authors recommended timely colon cancer screening for overweight and obese people. The findings couldn't say whether obesity causes polyps by itself, but if it does, that may be bad news for a world where obesity is on the rise. According to the World Health Organization, about 500 million people worldwide are obese. Colon cancer killed more than half a million people worldwide in 2008, WHO figures show. Publication: read full report http://yourhealth.asiaone.com/content/heavy-people-more-likely-have-colon-polyps-study







Heavy people more likely to have colon polyps





Overall, researchers found that 22 percent of overweight and obese people had colon polyps, compared to 19 percent in people of normal weight, and the polyp risk grew with increasing BMI. The findings suggest that obesity may be having an effect (on cancer development) much earlier than we thought, said Ashrafian. Most polyps dont cause any symptoms so they are usually not picked up before routine colonoscopy. During the procedure, the doctor cuts out polyps if there are any to make sure they dont turn into cancer. In their report, published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, the authors recommend timely colon cancer screening among overweight and obese people. The US Preventative Services Task Force, a government-funded expert panel, recommends colon cancer screening for people ages 50 to 75 (there are a number of different tests, including a cheap stool test, to choose from). In the UK, screening for colon cancer is offered by the National Health Service from age 60 to 69. The new study points to a need for screening that specifically targets obese people, said Dr. Joseph Anderson from Dartmouth in Hanover, New Hampshire, who was not involved in the study. There are different ways to screen people, and if a person is obese, they are at higher risk and should have a full colonoscopy, he added. A partial colonoscopy, also known as sigmoidoscopy, uses a flexible tube to look at the rectum and lower part of the colon, making it less invasive and uncomfortable than a full colonoscopy procedure. Obese people tend to have adenomas in the upper part of the colon, and sigmoidoscopy doesnt reach that far, said Anderson, who has written an editorial on this study for a forthcoming issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. But Dr. Michael Leitzman, who has researched obesity and adenomas, urges caution. her explanation http://www.khaleejtimes.com/kt-article-display-1.asp?section=health&xfile=/data/health/2012/July/health_July14.xml