Obesity In Men Could Dictate Future Colon Screenings

A Michigan State University study is shedding more light on the topic and has shown that elevated leptin -- a fat hormone -- higher body mass index and a larger waistline in men is associated with a greater likelihood of having colorectal polyps, precancerous growths linked to colon cancer. The result may put men at an even greater risk of the disease and also may mean their body weight could eventually be a deciding factor in whether a colonoscopy is in their future. Today, age and family history typically dictate a screening. Jenifer Fenton, assistant professor and researcher in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, and Kari Hortos, associate dean in MSU's College of Osteopathic Medicine at the Macomb University Center, led the 18-month, cross-sectional study, which followed 126 healthy, white American males ranging from 48 to 65 years of age. Participants showed no signs or symptoms of health issues, yet underwent routine colonoscopies. "What we found is 78 percent of the 126 men in the study were either overweight or obese based on their BMI or waist circumference. Of those, about 30 percent were found to have more than one polyp after colonoscopies were performed," said Fenton. "In fact, the more obese participants were 6.5 times more likely to have three polyps compared to their thinner counterparts." Sarah Comstock, a co-author of the study and research fellow in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, also indicated that the significance of the research is twofold. "Not only does it show the association that leptin and a higher BMI have with colon polyps, but it gives us a better snapshot on how body weight and other factors may actually help us determine who might be at a higher risk of developing polyps," she said. With obesity rates climbing during the past 20 years within the United States and colon cancer being the second-leading killer of men and women in the nation, these facts compelled Fenton and her team to conduct research which could identify the specific biomarkers of obesity and early-stage colon cancer and help in prevention efforts. Previous research published by Fenton in 2009 identified the connection between obesity and colon cancer through examining tissue hormones. These studies demonstrated that, at higher levels, leptin worked as a primary mechanism in inducing precancerous colon cells by increasing the blood supply to them and promoting their progression. "Even with all of our research, there's still more to be done, particularly in larger, more diverse populations, before any changes in screening recommendations can be made," said Fenton. "But we've definitely got a good start." Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by Michigan State University . Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. are speaking http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140204131704.htm







Too Much Sitting Tied to Higher Risk of Colon Polyps in Men





28 (HealthDay News) -- Men who are more sedentary face a higher risk of recurring colon polyps, according to a new study, even if these men break up their downtime with bouts of recreational activities such as walking, jogging or golf. This suggests that extended inactivity is itself a risk factor for noncancerous colon polyps, benign tumors that can give rise to colorectal cancer, the researchers said. Known as "colorectal adenomas," these polyps typically can be removed after being identified during a colorectal cancer screening, such as a colonoscopy. The recurrence of such polyps, however, seems to be greater among men (but not women) who are relatively less active. The researchers looked at activity levels among more than 1,700 men and women, and found that the more leisurely the men's lifestyle, the greater their risk for precancerous polyps. Men who spent 11 or more hours a day in seated endeavors -- such as writing or reading -- were 45 percent more likely to develop polyps than those who spent less than seven hours a day engaged in sedentary behavior. The study, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the U.S. National Cancer Institute, was schedule for presentation this week at the annual cancer-prevention conference of the American Association for Cancer Research, held in Oxon Hill, Md. "Sedentary behavior is emerging as a risk factor for poor health," study author Christine Sardo Molmenti, a postdoctoral research fellow in the department of epidemiology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, said in a conference news release. "Even among those who fulfill daily recommendations for physical activity, lengthy periods of sedentary behavior have been associated with early morbidity and mortality, leading to the 'active couch potato' paradigm," Sardo Molmenti said. Because this study is being presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. Although the study found an association between sedentary behavior and increased risk of colon polyps in men, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. The authors said no protective link has been established between being more active and having a lower risk for colorectal cancer. "Given the substantial increase in risk of [colon polyp] recurrence we observed for men with the highest sedentary time, we believe it would be beneficial to see 'reduce prolonged sitting time' added to the list of public-health recommendations currently in place for health promotion and disease prevention," Sardo Molmenti said. knowing it http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2013/10/28/too-much-sitting-tied-to-higher-risk-of-colon-polyps-in-men