New Treatment May Help Combat Deadliest Form Of Brain Cancer

Biotech Breakthroughs Brings Powerful Cancer Testing and Drugs to Market





In a study published in the journal Nature Materials, researchers developed special nanofibers, made out of polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer surrounded by a polyurethane. These nanofibers were meant breast cancer in men to mimic the blood vessels and nerve fibers that glioblastoma cells typically travel along within the brain. "The cancer cells normally latch onto these natural structures and ride them like a monorail to other parts of the brain," said study author Ravi Bellamkonda, professor and chair of the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University in Atlanta. "By providing an attractive alternative fiber, we can efficiently move the tumors along a different path to a destination that we choose." Researchers implanted the nanofibers into the brains of rats infected with human glioblastomas and compared them to a group of rats implanted with nanofibers not made read here with PCL, according to Medical News Today. After 18 days, rats implanted with PCL nanofibers showed significant reductions in tumor size compared to rats treated with non-PCL view nanofibers. For New treatment may help combat deadliest form of brain cancer original version, visit http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/02/18/new-treatment-may-help-combat-deadliest-form-brain-cancer/





New Prostate Cancer Treatment In Sioux Falls





Actually it had been 13 months, so maybe a little longer than I should have," Randall said. But Randall was not expecting his diagnosis. Around five years ago doctors said not only did he have prostate cancer, but it was very aggressive. "On a one to ten scale, ten being the highest, mine was a nine," Randall said. Randall has tried several different treatments, including a therapy where he had to travel to Minneapolis. This therapy, called PROVENGE , uses a patient's own immune cells to target prostate cancer cells. It's for patients who have advanced prostate cancer. For New Prostate Cancer Treatment In Sioux Falls original version, visit http://www.keloland.com/newsdetail.cfm/new-prostate-cancer-treatment-in-sioux-falls/?id=160399











That test is scheduled for release between 2015 and 2018 and could be used to predict metastasization in patients with breast, lung, prostate, and colorectal cancer. MetaStat is one of a handful of biotech companies that are making exciting advances in the world of testing and treating cancer and other deadly diseases. Oxygen Biotherapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: OXBT) was recently granted Fast Track status by the Food and Drug Administration for its drug levosimendan, which will reduce moridity in patients who have undergone cardiac surgery. A recent test showed that the drug does successfully provide renal benefits for those undergoing mitral valve surgery. Provectus Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. For Biotech Breakthroughs Brings Powerful Cancer Testing and Drugs to Market original version, visit http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20140218-905070.html





Cancer treatment doesn't have to be expensive





They note that 25% of total Medicare costs are spent in the last year of life, and 40% of that is spent in the last month of life. "Most people prefer to spend their last days of life at home with family and friends rather than in a hospital, but we still see high rates of hospital utilization in the last month of life," says Smith. Medicare data show that 60% of poor-prognosis cancer patients are admitted to a hospital in the last month of life, and 30% die there. The Hopkins team says studies show that hospice care improves symptoms, helps caregivers and costs less, with equal or better survival for patients, yet only half of cancer patients use hospice in their last month of life. They recommend that patients with poor prognoses have better and earlier discussions with their oncologists about chemotherapy use at the end of life, as well as transitions to hospice. Decision aids spanning these topics have been developed by Smith and colleagues and are endorsed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Unnecessary procedures Unneeded and expensive imaging poses another opportunity to limit costs of care, Smith and Kelly say. For Cancer treatment doesn't have to be expensive original version, visit http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/cancer-treatment-doesnt-have-to-be-expensive-021814.html