New At-home Saliva Test For Celiac Disease Genes

Simple blood test helps bring celiac disease out of the shadows





According to Prometheus, saliva-based genetic testing provides more DNA for evaluation, and samples are less likely to get contaminated in the process of collection. The test can be ordered online at www.MyCeliacID.com . After you make the request online, a licensed physician reviews and places the order in accordance with state and federal law. The company then sends you a tube in which you collect some saliva. When you return the tube to them (shipping is prepaid), they analyze your saliva for the presence of the HLA-DQ2 and HLADQ8 genes (both alpha and beta subunits), and the physician reviews and releases the result. Youll be notified by email (usually within 7 days, according to their site), and you can access your test results online via a secure link. Youll have a chance to make an appointment with a genetic counsellor if you wish. As of now, MyCeliacID is available only to residents of the U.S. (except New York), Canada and Mexico. Residents of New York (and everyone else) can still arrange for celiac gene tests using blood samples or cheek swabs through Kimball Genetics . Remember: Genetic tests do not diagnose celiac disease. As Ive explained in Genetic Testing for Celiac Disease , in general there are two possible outcomes of testing for celiac disease genes: You dont have the genes. a replacement http://celiacdisease.about.com/b/2009/06/30/new-at-home-saliva-test-for-celiac-disease-genes.htm











Banishing gluten The treatment for celiac diseasestop eating glutensounds simple, but isnt easy. It means forgoing anything made from wheat, barley, and rye. Even a small amount of the protein can stir up trouble. A University of Maryland study showed that just 50 milligrams (mg) of glutena slice of wheat bread contains 2,000 mgwas enough to rev up inflammation and intestinal damage. Its the hidden gluten that can really bedevil people with celiac disease, says Dr. Kelly, who is also a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. That means gluten lurking in foods that shouldnt have any. Take soy flour as an example. It shouldnt contain gluten. But if soybeans are transported in a truck or rail car that had previously held wheat, barley, or rye, or processed in a warehouse or plant that handles these grains, the soybeans and foods made from them can pick up enough gluten to fuel celiac disease. The FDA is currently working on regulations that will specify the maximum amount of gluten a food can contain and still be considered gluten free. But this wont do anything about contamination of truly gluten-free foods. Gluten-free bandwagon As many as half of people who buy gluten-free products dont have a clear cut or proven reaction to gluten. Instead, they go gluten free because they think they are sensitive to gluten, or it makes them feel better to avoid it. go to this web-site http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/simple-blood-test-helps-bring-celiac-disease-out-of-the-shadows-201212205712