Medications To Treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms

Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome Medication





Photo Credit stomach image by Alison Bowden from Fotolia.com Irritable bowel syndrome, commonly known as IBS, is an intestinal disorder that includes bouts of abdominal cramping, gas, constipation and diarrhea. IBS can be extremely uncomfortable and embarrassing but it is not fatal. Medications are used to treat the symptoms of IBS in conjunction with lifestyle changes. Medications for Diarrhea Nerve receptor antagonists relax the colon and slow waste movement through the lower bowel. This helps to reduce the occurrence of diarrhea. A nerve receptor antagonist must be prescribed by a gastroenterologist. At this time, nerve receptor antagonists are only used to treat women with IBS due to the side effects identified in male patients, states the Mayo Clinic. Alosetron (Lotronex) is a commonly prescribed nerve receptor antagonist. Your doctor may suggest that you take loperamide (Imodium) to treat diarrhea as well. Medication for Constipation A chloride channel activator is designed to increase the fluid in the intestines, preventing constipation associated with IBS. Lubiprostone (Amitiza) is a chloride channel activator that is approved to treat women age 18 and older who suffer from IBS-related constipation. According to the Mayo Clinic, Amitiza has not proven to effectively treat male patients with IBS. on yahoo http://www.livestrong.com/article/107869-medications-treat-irritable-bowel-syndrome/









Currently approved drugs for IBS address constipation associated with the disorder, but there are few options for diarrhea predominant IBS. Furiex founder and chairman Fred Eshelman said he believes the drug has the potential for blockbuster sales, which he defined as annual sales of between $750 million and $1 billion. Eluxadoline was tested at two doses against a placebo over the course of 12 weeks to meet requirements by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and for 26 weeks for European health regulators, in Phase III studies involving 2,428 patients, Furiex said. For the combined goal of improvement in abdominal pain and stool consistency for at least half the days in the study, eluxadoline achieved a statistically significant improvement at the 100 milligram and 75 mg doses through 12 weeks in both studies. On the 26-week measure, the higher dose succeeded in both studies but the lower dose missed statistical significance in one of the two trials, according to initial results released by the company. The success appeared to be driven by the percentage of patients reporting improvements in diarrhea, which ranged from 30 percent to 37 percent versus 22 percent and 20.9 percent for the placebo groups. When the composite goal was broken into its two components, researchers found a numerical improvement in pain response rates that did not achieve statistical significance. The drug appeared to be safe and well-tolerated in both studies, Furiex said. The most commonly reported side effects were constipation and nausea. The company plans to present a far more detailed analysis of the late stage studies at an upcoming medical meeting. "We're very excited about the path ahead and about how this can transform patients' lives," Almenoff said. he has a good point http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/02/04/us-furiex-bowel-idUKBREA1312A20140204?feedType=RSS&feedName=healthNewsMolt





Furiex irritable bowel syndrome drug succeeds in large trials



Furiex said it expected to seek European approval in early 2015. The company's shares rose as much as 165 percent to $121.97, valuing it at about $1.3 billion. "We believe that there are a lot of patients out there who need this drug. There is a huge unmet need," Furiex Chief Medical Officer June Almenoff said in a telephone interview. Currently approved drugs for IBS address constipation associated with the disorder, but there are few options for diarrhea predominant IBS. Furiex founder and chairman Fred Eshelman said he believes the drug has the potential for blockbuster sales, which he defined as annual sales of between $750 million and $1 billion. Eluxadoline was tested at two doses against a placebo over the course of 12 weeks to meet requirements by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and for 26 weeks for European health regulators, in Phase III studies involving 2,428 patients, Furiex said. For the combined goal of improvement in abdominal pain and stool consistency for at least half the days in the study, eluxadoline achieved a statistically significant improvement at the 100 milligram and 75 mg doses through 12 weeks in both studies. On the 26-week measure, the higher dose succeeded in both studies but the lower dose missed statistical significance in one of the two trials, according to initial results released by the company. The success appeared to be driven by the percentage of patients reporting improvements in diarrhea, which ranged from 30 percent to 37 percent versus 22 percent and 20.9 percent for the placebo groups. When the composite goal was broken into its two components, researchers found a numerical improvement in pain response rates that did not achieve statistical significance. The drug appeared to be safe and well-tolerated in both studies, Furiex said. The most commonly reported side effects were constipation and nausea. The company plans to present a far more detailed analysis of the late stage studies at an upcoming medical meeting. "We're very excited about the path ahead and about how this can transform patients' lives," Almenoff said. my company http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/04/us-furiex-bowel-idUSBREA1312A20140204?feedType=RSS&virtualBrandChannel=11563





Furiex irritable bowel syndrome drug succeeds in large trials





You should read the privacy policy of each website that you visit after you leave any of the WebMD Health Professional Network websites. We are not responsible for how other websites treat your privacy once you leave one of our websites. The WebMD Health Professional Network is comprised of several websites: medscape.com, medscape.org and theheart.org (referred to collectively as the "Professional Sites"), including any mobile optimized versions of the Professional Sites and the Medscape Mobile Device Application ("Medscape Mobile"). These properties are owned and operated by our affiliated companies. For example, WebMD LLC owns and operates medscape.com and Medscape Mobile, and Medscape, LLC owns and operates medscape.org and theheart.org. References to "WebMD" in this Privacy Policy mean WebMD LLC, including any company that WebMD controls (for example a subsidiary that it owns) and references to "Medscape" mean Medscape, LLC, including any company that Medscape controls. We refer to the Professional Sites that WebMD operates as the "WebMD Sites" and the Professional Sites that Medscape operates as the "Medscape Sites." Reference to "we" or "our" means WebMD and Medscape. We may share information among the subsidiaries of WebMD Health Corp. (our parent company) and the respective Professional Sites that we each own or control, but it is always protected under the terms of this Privacy Policy. You can visit our corporate site at www.wbmd.com to learn more about WebMD and Medscape, obtain investor information, and obtain contact information. Privacy Policy Changes As this Privacy Policy changes in significant ways, we will take steps to inform you of the changes. Minor changes to this Privacy Policy may occur that will not significantly affect the ways in which we each use your personally identifiable information. my review here http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/930844-medication