Kids' Ear Infections Cost U.s. Health System Nearly $3b Annually: Report

Children with ear infections averaged two more outpatient visits, 0.2 more emergency visits and had 1.6 more prescriptions filled than those without ear infections. Ear infections were associated with an extra $314 per child per year for outpatient care and an average of $17 in additional costs for medications. In total, ear infections cost $2.88 billion in 2009, according to the study in the January issue of the journal The Laryngoscope. "Although certain immunizations that target infection-causing bacteria may play a role in slightly reducing the overall rate of ear infections, millions of young kids will still have them," study co-author Dr. going here http://www.medicinenet.com/guide.asp?s=rss&k=DailyHealth&a=176206 Health Tip: Packing Baby's Diaper Bag (HealthDay News) -- Before you head out with baby in tow, make sure you've safely and properly packed a diaper bag. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers these suggestions: Bring along unopened jars of commercial baby food. Use ready-to-feed or powdered formula, or other foods that don't require refrigeration. Pack an insulated container with ice packs for perishables such as breast milk. When you're done traveling, store in the refrigerator. Keep spoons and forks in a separate bag to keep them clean. read review http://www.medicinenet.com/guide.asp?s=rss&k=DailyHealth&a=176220 Health Tip: Packing Baby's Diaper Bag Overall, slightly less than 4 percent of Americans 18 and older had serious thoughts about suicide in the past year. But for illicit drug users, the rate was 9.4 percent, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health report. The percentage of adults who said they had serious thoughts of suicide within the past year varied by the type of drug they used, ranging from 9.6 percent of those who used marijuana to nearly 21 percent of those who used sedatives for non-medical purposes. The report's findings are from a national survey of about 70,000 people, aged 12 and older. "Suicide takes a devastating toll on individuals, families and communities across our nation," Dr. Peter Delany, director of SAMHSA's Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Health, said in an agency news release. "We must reach out to all segments of our community to provide them with the support and treatment they need so that we can help prevent more needless deaths and shattered lives," Delany added. People in crisis or those who know someone who may be at immediate risk of attempting suicide are urged to call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255). cool training http://www.medicinenet.com/guide.asp?s=rss&k=DailyHealth&a=176222 Media Focus on Obesity May Backfire for Some Women 15 (HealthDay News) -- Older firefighters appear to develop heat resilience due to their long-term exposure to hot temperatures on the job, according to a new study. Researchers compared physically active firefighters and non-firefighters, about 51 years old, as they exercised in hot conditions. Compared to the firefighters, the non-firefighters reported higher levels of heat stress and felt that the workout was more physically challenging. The study was published recently in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene. "If you have older workers who work in the heat, they are in a better position to handle working in the heat as compared to their non-heat-exposed counterparts," study author Glen Kenny, a professor at the School of Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa in Canada, said in a journal news release. click now http://www.medicinenet.com/guide.asp?s=rss&k=DailyHealth&a=176205 Drug Abusers at Risk for Suicidal Thoughts, Survey FindsCompared To The Firefighters, The Non-firefighters Reported Higher Levels Of Heat Stress And Felt That The Workout Was More Physically Challenging. Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center, expressed several reservations about the study. "It was a somewhat contrived experiment and a small sample," he said. Katz cited other limitations of the study: The participants were all college-age, and potentially more emotionally impressionable; the effect on eating was measured immediately after reading the article and didn't allow time for the participants to put the information into perspective; and there might have been some anxiety about having to produce a summary of the article and be videotaped. Katz said, however, that the study's core message is important. "If you're struggling with your weight and you feel like your culture doesn't like fat people, you're probably going to think less of yourself," he said. "Your culture doesn't like you." Katz said he has found that it's necessary for people to stop blaming themselves for their weight problem before they can successfully lose weight. "It's related to their self-esteem," he said. What can people do to encourage an overweight friend or loved one to live healthier? go to this web-site http://www.medicinenet.com/guide.asp?s=rss&k=DailyHealth&a=176221