Inflammatory Bowel Disease During Pregnancy - Topic Overview

In some cases, active inflammatory bowel disease can be worse for the fetus than the medicines used to control symptoms. Ask your doctor which medicines are safe for you to take during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Your doctor will look at your symptoms and your pregnancy and will be able to tell you about the risks of medicine for you. In general: Aminosalicylates are usually safe to use during pregnancy and breast-feeding. The use of corticosteroids will be decided on a case-by-case basis. They can be considered for women with moderate to severe inflammatory bowel disease when the risk of active disease is more harmful to the baby than the risk of taking the medicine during pregnancy. The use of antibiotics such as metronidazole will be decided on a case-by-case basis by your doctor. Ciprofloxacin should not be used. The use of immunomodulators azathioprine and mercaptopurine will be decided on a case-by-case basis. They can be considered for women with moderate to severe inflammatory bowel disease when the risk of active disease is more harmful to the baby than the risk of taking the medicine during pregnancy. The use of cyclosporine will be decided on a case-by-case basis. It may be considered for women with moderate to severe inflammatory bowel disease when the risk of active disease is more harmful to the baby than the risk of taking the medicine during pregnancy. learn more http://www.webmd.com/ibd-crohns-disease/tc/inflammatory-bowel-disease-during-pregnancy-topic-overview





Thalidomide May Help Kids With Crohn's Disease





It's estimated that about 500,000 people in the United States have Crohn's disease, and for about one-quarter of those patients, symptoms started in childhood, according to background information in the study. Pediatric cases of Crohn's disease tend to be more severe, and nearly one in five children with the disease will require surgery within five years of when the disease starts, the study noted. Thalidomide was first used in the late 1950s as a treatment for insomnia, anxiety and morning sickness, according to the March of Dimes. It was approved for use in Europe, Japan, Canada and Australia, but never in the United States. By the early 1960s, it was apparent that the drug caused significant birth defects, including severely malformed or missing arms and legs. The medication was quickly withdrawn from the market. It remained off the market for a significant time until researchers realized that the drug had other uses, particularly for dampening an overactive immune system. And if care was taken to ensure that no one who might be pregnant or become pregnant took the drug, its other side effects were less serious, according to the March of Dimes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of thalidomide to treat a complication of leprosy, and the drug was approved in 2006 to treat multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow. Thalidomide is currently being studied as a treatment for a number of inflammatory diseases, but in all cases where the drug is used, any woman of reproductive age must be counseled on the potential for serious birth defects should she become pregnant while on thalidomide. more tips here http://consumer.healthday.com/gastrointestinal-information-15/crohn-s-disease-news-165/thalidomide-may-help-kids-with-crohn-s-disease-682528.html