High-fiber Diet Helps Prevent Progression Of Diverticular Disease

Some people experience less severe pain that fluctuates and gradually builds over days. Fever, nausea, constipation and diarrhea, and, occasionally, urinary problems may be present. Diverticulitis is mild and uncomplicated for about three-fourths of people with the condition. Treatment includes nonprescription pain medication, antibiotics and a liquid diet for a few days, typically administered from home. Diverticulitis can be more serious and even life-threatening. Complications can include an infected, pus-filled pocket (abscess), a diverticulum rupturing into the abdominal cavity, or bowel obstruction. Intravenous antibiotics and surgery may be needed to remove the affected portion of the colon. Doctors aren't sure what causes these colon abnormalities. It's suspected to be related to a lack of dietary fiber, lack of exercise, obesity and aging. click here http://www.healthnewsdigest.com/news/Diet_190/High-fiber-Diet-Helps-Prevent-Progression-of-Diverticular-Disease.shtml












Diverticular disease of the colon





In most cases, the body's immune system is able to contain the infection, confining it to a small area on the outside of the colon. In other cases, though, the infection enlarges to become a larger abscess, or it extends to the entire lining of the abdomen, a critical complication called peritonitis. Pain is the major symptom. Because diverticulosis typically occurs in the sigmoid colon, the pain is usually most pronounced in the lower left part of the abdomen, but other areas may be involved. Fever is also very common, sometimes accompanied by chills. If the inflamed sigmoid is up against the bladder, a man may develop enough urinary urgency, frequency, and discomfort to mimic prostatitis or a bladder infection. Other symptoms may include nausea, loss of appetite, and fatigue. Some patients have constipation, others diarrhea. learn more http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/Harvard_Mens_Health_Watch/2010/August/diverticular-disease-of-the-colon