Given Imaging Announces New Studies That Affirm Pillcam Sb As The Gold Standard For Detecting And Di

Endoscopic placement may present additional risks. Medical, endoscopic, or surgical intervention may be necessary to address any of these complications, should they occur. About Given Imaging Since pioneering the field of capsule endoscopy in 2001, Given Imaging has become a world leader in GI medical devices, offering health care providers a range of innovative options for visualizing, diagnosing and monitoring the digestive system. The company offers a broad product portfolio including PillCam(R) capsule endoscope for the small bowel, esophagus and colon. The company also offers industry-leading GI functional diagnostic solutions including ManoScan(R) high resolution manometry, Bravo(R) capsule-based pH monitoring, Digitrapper(R) pH-Z monitoring, and SmartPill(R) motility monitoring systems. Given Imaging is committed to delivering breakthrough innovations to the GI community and supporting its ongoing clinical needs. Given Imaging's headquarters are located in Yoqneam, Israel, with operating subsidiaries in the United States, Germany, France, Japan, Australia, Vietnam, Hong Kong and Brazil. For more information, please visit givenimaging.com. Forward-Looking Statements This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the "safe harbor" provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, projections about our business and our future revenues, expenses and profitability. sneak a peek at this website http://www.marketwatch.com/story/given-imaging-announces-new-studies-that-affirm-pillcam-sb-as-the-gold-standard-for-detecting-and-diagnosing-small-bowel-diseases-2013-10-15












Rate of small bowel biopsy is low in the U.S.





Actually, this study shows that some of these undiagnosed patients may be coming to see a gastroenterologist and still are not getting the biopsy they need for a diagnosis." Dr. Lebwohl and colleagues analyzed the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative National Endoscopy Database (CORI-NED), a multicenter database that represents a broad section of endoscopy centers throughout the country, including community-based as well as academic settings. They identified all patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy during the years 2004-2009 for one of the following reasons: Weight loss, iron deficiency, anemia, or diarrhea. "Any one of these symptoms could be compatible with celiac disease. We know that the blood tests for making this diagnosis are not perfect, and so we argue that most patients having an endoscopy for one of these reasons should have a biopsy of the small intestine to test for celiac disease." In fact, physicians did a small bowel biopsy in only 43 percent of the more than 13,000 patients having an endoscopy during this 6 year period. "We thought that biopsy rates would be higher, especially considering the increased public awareness of celiac disease," said Dr. Lebwohl. Although the rates increased somewhat over time, in the most recent year of the study (2009) the biopsy rate remained only 51 percent. "As a result, it remains possible that a patient with celiac disease may seek health care, see a gastroenterologist, and have an endoscopy, and yet may still remain undiagnosed." These low biopsy rates were not uniform: men were less likely to have a biopsy as compared to women. This may provide a clue to understanding a long-observed curiosity: the lopsided gender ratio among patients with celiac disease. "Men are just as likely as women to develop celiac disease, but women are much more likely to be diagnosed," said Peter H.R. Green, MD, professor of clinical medicine in the Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, director of CUMC's Celiac Disease Center, and senior author of the study. "Perhaps men aren't being diagnosed because their doctors aren't biopsying them, even when symptoms are compatible with celiac disease. This becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy: men aren't being biopsied, diagnosis rates in men remain low, and so doctors erroneously think that celiac disease is a 'woman's disease,'" said Dr. Green. Biopsy rates were also lower among older patients, African-Americans, and Hispanics. click to investigate http://www.news-medical.net/news/20120630/Rate-of-small-bowel-biopsy-is-low-in-the-US.aspx