Given Imaging Announces New Studies That Affirm Pillcam Sb As The Gold Standard For Detecting And Di

"Emergency Video Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding, poster," poster P1332:presented by Christoph Schlag M.D., and colleagues, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany, analyzed the use of PillCam capsule endoscopy (CE) for acute gastrointestinal bleeding in the emergency setting. Of the patients who failed to have their source of bleeding identified with gastroscopy, 93% showed complete examination using emergency CE and 73% had the bleeding source identified with CE. Results confirm that for patients with signs of acute upper/mid gastrointestinal bleeding who have had a negative gastroscopy, emergency CE can be used to immediately detect the bleeding source and to guide therapy. About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. About PillCam SB The PillCam SB capsule is a minimally invasive procedure to visualize and monitor small bowel abnormalities associated with Crohn's disease, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). The PillCam measures 11 mm x 26 mm and weighs less than four grams. Now in its third generation, PillCam SB 3 contains an imaging device and light source and transmits images at a rate between two and six images per second. Initially cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2001, PillCam SB is an accurate, patient-friendly tool used in patients two years and older by physicians to visualize the small bowel. PillCam SB 3 builds on Given Imaging's unique expertise and collaborative efforts as an industry leader that includes more than 2 million uses of PillCam capsules in patients worldwide and more than 1,900 clinical studies. The risks of PillCam capsule endoscopy include capsule retention, aspiration and skin irritation. sneak a peek at these guys http://www.marketwatch.com/story/given-imaging-announces-new-studies-that-affirm-pillcam-sb-as-the-gold-standard-for-detecting-and-diagnosing-small-bowel-diseases-2013-10-15







Studies Confirming Efficacy of PillCam SB for Detecting Small Bowel Diseases Presented at UEG Week





This is especially valuable for pediatric patients which we have been following-up for many years." "The Diagnostic Value in Pediatric Small Bowel Assessment by Wireless Capsule Endoscopy: A Tertiary Center Experience," poster P1333: presented by Efstratios Saliakellis M.D., and colleagues, Great Ormond Street Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom, assessed the diagnostic value, tolerance and safety of PillCam in pediatric patients. The retrospective review of PillCam capsule endoscopy (CE) in 291 children showed over 60% had positive findings and 34% were diagnostic in terms of establishing a diagnosis or altering the therapeutic approach in the patient. The results, which represent the largest cohort of pediatric patients and include the youngest child ever to undergo capsule endoscopy, demonstrated that with careful selection, CE is a useful and safe diagnostic modality in children with suspected small bowel diseases. "Why Should We Still Use Capsule Endoscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease," oral presentation OP430: presented by Lucia Marquez M.D., and colleagues, Hospital del Mar, Digestive Diseases, Barcelona, Spain, analyzed the impact of PillCam capsule endoscopy (CE) on the diagnosis and management of suspected or established Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Results confirmed that CE findings led to a new diagnosis in over 40% of cases and that CE is a useful tool for diagnosis of new IBD as well as for guiding treatment. "Findings and Long Term Outcomes for Patients Following Video Capsule Endoscopy to Investigate Iron Deficiency Anemia," poster P1336: presented by Janisha Patel M.D., and colleagues, Kings College Hospital, Dept. of Hepatology, London, United Kingdom, observed long term outcomes in patients who have undergone capsule endoscopy to investigate iron deficiency anemia (IDA). The results of this retrospective study analyzing long term outcomes of 115 patients who had a negative upper and lower GI endoscopy, showed capsule endoscopy (CE) presented relevant findings in over 50% of patients who underwent CE to investigate unexplained IDA and a significant number of these patients were then actively treated. "Emergency Video Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding, poster," poster P1332:presented by Christoph Schlag M.D., and colleagues, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany, analyzed the use of PillCam capsule endoscopy (CE) for acute gastrointestinal bleeding in the emergency setting. Of the patients who failed to have their source of bleeding identified with gastroscopy, 93% showed complete examination using emergency CE and 73% had the bleeding source identified with CE. Results confirm that for patients with signs of acute upper/mid gastrointestinal bleeding who have had a negative gastroscopy, emergency CE can be used to immediately detect the bleeding source and to guide therapy. About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. get more http://www.azooptics.com/news.aspx?newsID=18030







Bowel Prep No Better Than Fasting Before Capsule Endoscopy for Obscure GI Bleeding





The capsule is disposable and usually takes eight hours to move through the digestive system, after which it is passed harmlessly in a bowel movement. Capsule endoscopy does not require sedation and is painless. Capsule endoscopy can be used to diagnose hidden GI bleeding, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, and other malabsorption problems, tumors (benign and malignant), vascular malformations, medication injury, and to a lesser extent, esophageal disease. Currently, capsule endoscopy cannot be used to biopsy or treat any conditions. Diagnostic results of CE may be reduced when visibility of the mucosa is impaired because of intestinal content or slow capsule progression. Prior to this study, there was only a limited consensus that preparations or prokinetics (drugs that promote gastrointestinal motility) probably improve the quality of small bowel cleanliness. Currently, an overnight fast only is proposed by the CE manufacturer. "The aim of our study was to compare bowel preparation with oral sodium phosphate versus none, without prokinetic, for capsule endoscopy examination of the small bowel in obscure GI bleeding," said study lead author Marie-George Lapalus, MD, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. "We found that there was no difference observed for cleanliness and visibility between the group that was given oral sodium phosphate and the group that fasted. Therefore, our study concludes that oral sodium phosphate cannot be recommended for CE exploration in patients with obscure GI bleeding." Patients and Methods A total of 129 patients with obscure GI bleeding were enrolled in this prospective, multicenter, controlled trial study between December 2004 and February 2006. The patients (53 men and 76 women with a median age of 56.9 years), were randomized into two groups. good stuff http://www.endonurse.com/news/2008/06/bowel-prep-no-better-than-fasting-before-capsule.aspx