Advances In Inflammatory Bowel Diseasewhat's New, What's Next

The findings and recommendations of these expert workgroups are presented in a series of detailed "Challenges in IBD Research" reports, now available in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the CCFA. Each workgroup is assigned to specific topic areas including genetics, epidemiology and environmental factors, the "microbiome" (intestinal bacteria), epithelial cell biology, innate and adaptive immunity, clinical classification and prognostic models, and optimizing medical therapy. A special "Challenges in IBD Research" progress report appears in the March issue of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Experts Outline New Agenda for IBD Research Based on a thorough review in each area, the workgroups have defined key research priorities for the next few years, including: Defining clinically relevant subgroups of IBD patientsusing different types of information to predict aggressiveness of disease, complications, and response to treatment. Understanding the environmental factors affecting the risk and course of IBDincluding environmental "triggers" and a specific focus on the role of diet. Clarifying the complex interrelationships among genes, bacteria, and epithelial and immune responsesfocusing on cellular pathways and critical cell types that may lead to new "therapeutic targets." Determining the optimal treatment approaches and strategies through comparative effectiveness studies. The workgroup reports also identify the resources needed to carry out this ambitious research agenda, including a "centralized and distributable infrastructure" for integrated studies of IBD in humans and long-term follow-up studies of children and adults with IBD. "Through development of the ambitious research goals outlined in this document, the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America has again led the effort to further the understanding of IBD," said Dr. Lee Denson of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. "CCFA is keen to advance this research agenda in 2013 and beyond." Building on Recent Scientific and Clinical Advances The CCFA research agenda builds on recent advances in scientific and clinical research. They include major strides in IBD geneticsmore than 160 genes affecting susceptibility to Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis have now been identified. Using sophisticated techniques, researchers have gained new insights into the complex interactions between intestinal bacteria and immune responses, including the role of specific types of immune cells. Clinical studies have improved the ability to predict the response to IBD treatment in children and to track the short- and long-term adverse effects of IBD treatments. Progress has also been made in understanding the risks and benefits of medical and surgical treatments for key patient subgroups, including pregnant women and newborns. These studies point the way toward future efforts to optimize treatment for individual patients with IBD. More information: The complete workgroup reports are available for direct download at http://links.lww.com/IBD/A77. this review http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-advances-inflammatory-bowel-diseasewhat.html





Endometriosis Tied to Higher Risk of Crohn's, Colitis





They may share common causes or perhaps the birth control pills used to treat endometriosis may increase the risk of inflammatory bowel disease. The new findings appear online Dec. 19 in the journal Gut. The study included nearly 38,000 Danish women who were hospitalized for endometriosis from 1997 to 2007. After 13 years of follow-up, 320 of these women developed inflammatory bowel disease, including 228 cases of ulcerative colitis and 92 cases of Crohn's disease. Overall, women with endometriosis had a 50 percent higher odds of developing inflammatory bowel disease compared to women in the general population, the study found. The increased risk lasted for up to 20 years after being diagnosed with endometriosis, report researchers led by Dr. Tine Jess, an epidemiologist at Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark. The risk was even more pronounced among women whose endometriosis was verified surgically, the team noted. Among these women, the risk for inflammatory bowel diseases jumped to 80 percent compared to women without endometriosis in the general population. Inflammatory bowel disease is the umbrella term for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and related conditions. Ulcerative colitis is an inflammation of the inner lining of the colon. By contrast, Crohn's disease involves all layers of the intestine and can occur in both the small intestine and colon. Symptoms of both include persistent diarrhea , abdominal pain or cramps, blood passing through the rectum, fever and weight loss . "This is the first study undertaken to investigate the association between endometriosis and inflammatory bowel disease," Jess said. "Persisting abdominal symptoms in patients with endometriosis may be a sign of concomitant inflammatory bowel disease," she said. lowest price http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=152823





Inflammatory Bowel Disease Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2013





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