MRSA Support Group

Staph infections are infections caused by the bacteria Staphylococcus. They include skin infections, pneumonia, blood poisoning, toxic shock syndrome, and food poisoning. Infection can happen through contact, especially if you have open wounds. Most infections are treatable with antibiotics. If you have been infected with staph, join the group for support and advice.

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Donating blood

I spent this past Wednesday evening and Thursday morning trying to find out if I could donate blood. After contacting the red cross and being put through to 4 different people, I was told that I could indeed donate as long as I was not active at the time or on antibiotics. Since I finished my antibiotics 2 months ago, I was good to go, and I donated Thursday afternoon. It made me feel good to know I could donate because I have A-negative blood and there is a critical shortage.

Replies

deleted_user
deleted_user

Thank you for donating. I had a transfusion when I had my daighter, it saved my life. The most important thing that donating blood with my family is how it saved my newborn son. I had gotten antibiodies when I had my transfusion that was not compatible to his fathers blood. I didn't have a clue that I had them or it would be life threatening to a baby. I had to go for blood work every 2 days to see if the titers were rising. When they did I had to undergo an amnio and have fetus blood transfusions while still pg. After I gave birth 10 weeks early my son had to have transfusions for the first year of his life. It had to be an exact match or he would die. It is so important that all who can donate do so. It is not only the blood type but hundreds of other things that make up your blood. You could be that one match who saves a life. I would like to thank everyone out there who donates. I will never know who that one special person was who saved my son but I will thank him or her in my heart and prayers forever.
deleted_user
deleted_user

Thank you for that info.I am not active right now but was told since I had MRSA internally at one point ,that I was a carrier and could not donate.I have o negative blood and it was on the red cross list here as a needed type but I was turned away.After reading your post I might print it out and bring it in with me the next time.
deleted_user
deleted_user

I truly admire those with critical blood types for their efforts in donating, but this is a tough one. I had systemic MRSA (in my bloodstream). I narrowly survived and now, after several months, I'm having followup nasal cultures each month. My first nasal culture was negative. Based on stormco's experience, I assume Red Cross would let me donate.
Does anyone know if there's any MRSA testing done on blood before it's actually used for transfusions? If I were on the receiving end of a transfusion, I'd like more assurance than the donor's statement of treatment, and the opinion of the Red Cross staff that the donated blood wasn't MRSA infected.
Dying from lack of blood or dying from MRSA -- tough choice.
deleted_user
deleted_user

Yes they do test for MRSA along with so many screenings. The blood is totally clean when given.