Meniere's Disease Support Group

Meniere's disease is a balance disorder of the inner ear. The symptoms of Meniere's are variable; not all sufferers experience the same symptoms. However, "classic Meniere's" is considered to comprise the following four symptoms: Periodic episodes of rotary vertigo, hearing loss, tinnitus, and a sensation of fullness or pressure in one or both ears.

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flying

hi new to this site and to meneire's.diagnosed last january after a year of suffering.i am wondering if anyone with this condition ever flys or takes sea journeys,seems impossible to me,what if an attack happens on the expected travel date,etc.

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deleted_user
deleted_user

I was wondering the same thing. Frank is from Holland and would like me to go with him next year. I think the altitude will do me in. Ant experience on this is welcome. Thanks. Mallow9uk you seem like a puppy for having meniers for a year, Lucky you,,,,, I''m on year 14 good luck.
deleted_user
deleted_user

I have to fly for my job and it is not fun at all. During my first year of MD before I was diagnosed flying was out of the question and my company was gracious enough to let me stay home and work from my home office while I was figuring out what was wrong. When I started to fly again after that first year I was not sure if I was go to be able to do it. I almost always got an attack on the plane and I would have to spend 12 to 18 hours in bed after getting off the plane before I could do any work. Now it still takes me a few hours of rest to recover from a flight. I always take a cane with me when I travel because I sometimes need help with stability for a while when I get off of a plane.

I first thought that the change in cabin pressure would trigger an attack but it turns out that turbulence and banking turns on final approaches are my big triggers, (although both of my ears feel really full while I am flying). There is nothing on a plane that is not moving while in flight so you cannot relax and focus on something that is not moving. Just two days ago I had to fly from Milwaukee to Philadelphia. I ended up on a small commuter jet and bounced my whole way to Philadelphia. When we go over the airport we had to circle for an hour through thunder storms and when we got on the ground it took me the better part of two days to recover and sleeping 12+ hours each night. If I could figure out a way not to fly anymore I would. Flying is a necessary evil and I have learned to cope somewhat with it, but if you have not flown since getting MD make sure you have Velum or at least Dramamine with you and plan of have plenty of time to sleep and recover when you land. I have had to tell my boss that I will never be able to get off the plane and go straight to work. So far it has worked out.
deleted_user
deleted_user

I've flown 2x since I was diagnosed. The first time, I spent the entire trip w/my head against the side of the plane. I was alone, and flew from Philly to Florida. I was fine once the plane landed.

The next time I flew it was to the Dominican Republic, and I was w/my hubby. Someone recommended an ear plug called (if I remember correctly) Ear Planes. I got them, and had no problems at all on that flight!

The one day, we were supposed to go fishing. I've gone out in boats b4 some days I have a problem, some days I don't. We had to go to a different resort area for the boat, and the guy drove like such an idiot, I was seasick b4 I ever got to the boat. I did no fishing, but spent the whole time horizontal in the cabin. And, once we got back to the resort, it took me several hours b4 I felt ok. I don't know how I'd do on a larger boat. I've often wondered if I could do a cruise or not.
deleted_user
deleted_user

I have had Menieres for 10 years and I fly every couple of months. Sometimes I have no problems and sometimes I get terrible vertigo and pain. I am not even sure it is from the flying or if it is just random. However, I always take my valium and meclazine before I fly which seems to preempt any attack so I am moderately comfortable.
deleted_user
deleted_user

thx for this feedback guys,this is quite reassuring,planning a trip next year so i now know i can go ahead with plans
deleted_user
deleted_user

Great feedback on flying. This is not something you would learn from a Dr or ENT. Dizzyinni what is Ear Planes and where did you get it. Is valium oris it velum, are they not antidepressents. How does this work for flying? You folks are so good to learn from. Thnks for the input.
deleted_user
deleted_user

Valium (diazepam) is a benzodiazepine drug like lorazepam. They work to put to sleep the part of your brain that receives info from your ears.

I take valium during an attack of vertigo to lessen or shorten the attack.

As with most MD patients I take a daily diuretic (lasix) and then have valium and meclazine (antivert) on standby incase I get an attack. I take valium preemptively when I fly as a just in case.
deleted_user
deleted_user

valium seems like a great idea,i get really panicky when i'm having these attacks.i'll ask the doctor next week,but british doctors aren't always very accomadating
deleted_user
deleted_user

Nancy213, Ear Planes are a type of ear plug. I got them at the air port b4 we left. Since we were going out of the country we had to be at the airport waaaaaay early, and I got to talking to someone. I mentioned about having MD, and she told me about them. I was so grateful that she told me about them. I goggled them, and came up w/this.

http://www.cirrushealthcare.com/EarPlanes-C8.aspx
deleted_user
deleted_user

I flew from utah to florida in June, and luckily didn't have any problems. My ent told me to do a spray of afrin in each nostril before take off & it would help with the pressure in my ears-so I did, and all was fine. Good luck to you!
deleted_user
deleted_user

once again thank you all for your feedback good luck to everyone with this annoying condition