Hives Support Group

Hives is a relatively common form of allergic reaction that causes raised red skin welts. These welts can range in diameter from 5 mm (0.2 inches) or more, itch severely, and often have a pale border. Urticaria is generally caused by direct contact with an allergenic substance, or an immune response to food or some other allergen. Hives can also be caused by stress.

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Salicylates and Hives??

I am new to this group. I had my first bout of chronic hives 3 years ago and they lasted 6 months. They have now returned and I would really like to try to find what is causing them. I have read, and suspected in my case, that saliylates may be a trigger. Has anyone else in the group had this experience, tried to limit salicylates in their diet, or know how to find a salicylate free/limited diet?

Replies

deleted_user
deleted_user

Hi there, I'm new to the group too. I have definately been down the salicylate road. If you're looking for info on a good salicylate free program you should check out the Feingold Diet. The Feingold Diet has had some resurgence in popularity in recent years as a food based treatment for ADD, but was initially used by Doctor Feingold as treatment for chronic hives.
I did this program for awhile but never achieved fantastic results, however I wasn't very strict and was still drinking and smoking at the time. I will say this, the program is not an easy one to follow.
I myself had relentless chronic hives ever since I was 20 years old that lasted ten years and I've tried TONS of stuff. But these days I'm pretty much completely symtom free. Here's what I do. I eat a pretty much vegan diet, based on the macrobiotic diet created by George Oshawa and later popularized by Michio Kushi. What's great about this diet is it cuts out foods that I feel I have found, through years of trial and error, to be major triiggers, like sugar and coffee and spicy foods. If you want to read a great book on macrobiotics pick up The Hip Chick's Guide to Macrobiotics by Jessica Porter, it's what really got me going on the program.
You should also going to the supplements section of a health food store and picking up some Quercetin, which is a tonic you take every day and it slowly conditions your body to stop reacting in hives.
But personally, the most exciting discovery, for me was to start using a steam room regularly. I have one at my gym, I go in every day. When I don't go for awhile I feel my skin start to get prickly and reactive again.
I just want to emphasize that I really was in hell for years because of my condition, but now I'm not enslaved by my hives anymore and I'm really starting to enjoy my life again, so try this stuff out!
Good Luck and Be Well!
release2find
release2find

Hi, was researching salicylates here on DS b/c of itchiness after eating certain foods (no rash, no hives, - just mild itchiness in face, arms). Seems it happens more often--more frequently..but allergy tests do not detect an allery. Just found out about salicylate intolerance/sensitivity yesterday and am trying to learn more...Appreciated the info in the archived posts. THis one seems especially helpful and relevant to me...and will continue reading other similar posts (or posts on salicylates) Thanks..CoCo..