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Lovenox injections for a long flight?

I'm not quite there yet with being able to take a long flight, but sometimes while sitting around thinking back to the good ol' days before my DVT episode, I think that I would like to again at some point.

I am familiar with most of the standard methods to prevent DVT on flights (get up and walk, stay hydrated, don't drink alcohol, foot exercises... get up and walk again ). But, I've seen in a few articles that taking a preventative shot of Lovenox if the flight is especially long is another one.

Firstly, has anyone done this? I'm wondering how easy it is to get those syringes through the airport screeners and on to the plane? If they don't allow bottles of water and nail clippers, I have to think they will have a fit with a couple of syringes? And for the flight back, I would need to carry another shot, but am kinda concerned with how well Lovenox "travels". Can it go bad if it's exposed to heat or cold?

Just curious if anyone has faced these issues yet and what kind of experience you had!

Thanks !

-Dan

Replies

MSM24
MSM24

I was on it for over 6 months. It does say on the package to keep it somewhere in the 70's. It can't get too hot or too cold... I think you would need to talk to someone in the airport about that maybe they could put it in a safe place for you and then give it back to you at the end of the flight. I never flew with it maybe someone can give more info.
deleted_user
deleted_user

Hi dhy,
My consultant advised me that when I am no longer on Warfarin I should always take heparin shots whenever I take a flight over four hours. His advice was to make sure you take two doses with you for each way, just to make sure you are covered in case your flight is delayed.
As for the practicalities, I recently made enquiries how to take syringes on board and this is what they said:
1. Always carry your medication in your hand luggage as your hold luggage might get lost or delayed.
2. Get a letter from your doctor explaining that you need the injectable medication.
3. When you get to the security at the aiport show them the syringes (in original packaging, if possible) and doctor's letter. They should let you pass. You don't have to let your airline know, but it helps to find out whether they have a sharps box on the plane to dispose of your used syringes if you want to.

I am trying all this out on the 6th of June as I will be flying to France and due to the dangers of drinking and warfarin (it's my wedding so I don't really want to limit myself to two small glasses over a 12-hour celebration) we are working out a bridging plan where I go back onto the shots for a week or so. I'll let you know how I get on :-D
deleted_user
deleted_user

Oh, forgot to ask: Was your profile picture taken in China?
deleted_user
deleted_user

Thanks all for the good info on this! Very helpful if any of us need to take any long flights.

Pip - Congrats on your upcoming wedding. Very unique idea on that bridging plan twist ... and I thought it was just for surgeries! :) Oh, yes, that pic was taken in China. Back before I knew what "DVT" even stood for... Oh, the good ol' days.... ;-)
deleted_user
deleted_user

Hello there!

My docotr recommended taking a shot of the lovenox the day before, the day of, and the day after any flight that's more than 4 hours.

You're doctor can give you a customs cirtificate to show at the airport, but t be honest I've beeen on 6 flights since finishingmy warfarin treatment, and have just shown up[ at the air port with a discharge note from the hospital. As long as its official looking, and says your name and the medication name, they will let you on.

On one flight they were a bit doubtful, and all that happened was they still let me fly, but the air cabin crew had to look aftermy medication whilst on the flight. (didn't actually need to inject myself whilst flying, on the day of the flight i took it in the airport about 2 hours before the flight).

Take care! x x
deleted_user
deleted_user

I\'m in the US, and I have taken two domestic flights with Lovenox. I just put the syringes and my prescription for them (the pharmacy label) in the quart-size bag that you\'re supposed to put liquids in, and put that bag in those bins that go through the screening machines. My first trip was short and the syringes and pharmacy label fit into the same quart bag as my other liquids, while my second trip was longer and I ended up with a separate quart bag just for the Lovenox. Nobody said anything to me before or after the screening.

The Lovenox instructions say to store at 77 degrees F (25C), but that "excursions are permitted" (!) to 59 to 86 degrees F (15-13C). Supposedly, when it goes "bad" due to being outside this range, it can look murky, instead of clear, or so I once read somewhere.
deleted_user
deleted_user

Also, these flights were taken from major airports with lots of international flights (even though I flew domestically). Not sure how smaller regional airports would handle the Lovenox issue.
deleted_user
deleted_user

Thanks Shyla and Xls for the new replies (and sorry I missed them earlier!!). That\'s great info and good news that you were able to take the Lovenox along with you.

I really hope I can travel again someday, though I\'ll start with small distances and see if I can work up to the long ones again someday.

Now, if only I can convince my doctor to prescribe the Lovenox for me when I do go. I\'m not sure if it\'s just me, but I have had a heck of a time getting them to let me have this stuff. Maybe a Hemo would be more agreeable to this ?

Thanks again!
deleted_user
deleted_user

As far as getting the Lovenox, I think part of the issue may be the type of insurance you have. It is so expensive, and some insurers will not appove it even if your doctor writes a prescription for it without a lot of extra work on the doctor\'s part (the whole pre-authorization thing). Other insurers don\'t require that, and will fill it no problem with your doctor\'s prescription.
deleted_user
deleted_user

Hi again,
One follow-up to this useful thread on Lovenox for long plane flights -- For those of you who were able to get prescriptions from your doc for the injections, what kind of dosing did you get? Preventative (eg 30mg - 40mg) or Full strength ( based on your body weight - eg. 80mg in my case) ?

My Hemo seems to prefer the preventative dose, but I'm curious to see if others are getting the full dosage for their trips?

Thanks,
Dan
JEB2007
JEB2007

I haven't had experience with the shots while flying (my trips have stayed under 2 hours per flight). But I spoke w/ my hemo before being discharged and he said to just call up when I need Lovenox for it. My PCP is really knowledgeable about FVL and would describe it too. I think that for the sake of it being easier, I'd approach the hemo for the shots, and also if something does occur during the trip (God forbid it), he's already in the loop.
Lwynn12
Lwynn12

I know this was a fairly old post but I am wondering if dhy063 ever did take a long haul flight and how he made out? I am only 6 months out from my DVT but do hope to travel someday. Anyone out there done a long haul flight and did you take Lovenox?