Discussion Topic

Pellet Stoves

Posted on 03/29/09, 02:33 pm
Does anyone else here have a big problem with pellet stoves and their emissions? My G-d, I get so sick from the fumes, whether interior or exterior sources.

Those pellets cannot be completely natural, because I react so strongly and so quickly to them. I lose cognitive ability, muscle control, experience numbness and tingling in my body and limbs, headache, nausea, emotional distress.

I bring it up because I just took a walk, and was "hit" by pellet stove fumes on the walk. Luckily, I beat a hasty retreat, but it still gave me unpleasant symptoms.

Every season has its perils, lawn chemicals, fertilizers and pesticides all spring, summer and some of fall, then the wood and pellet stoves in fall and winter.

Showing 5 Replies
  • Reply #1 03/29/09  3:28pm
    We have to put plastic on our windows so the smell of fire places doesn't come in. I was experiencing heartburn and dizziness when it started it get colder. I had no idea why it was happening and my mom bought the plastic to keep our house sealed/warmer during the winter. After she did that my heart burn went away and my dizziness got better so it was defiantly the smoke. I'm kind of sad because that used to be my favorite winter smell.
  • Reply #2 03/29/09  3:53pm
    I know, I used to live across the street from a pond when I was young, and every winter we'd skate and have fires on the pond. My dad would be there, and my brother and neighborhood kids, and it was so awesome. And now, I can't stand wood smoke.
  • Reply #3 03/30/09  7:27am
    I have to ask: what is a pellet stove? I have never heard of one of them.
  • Reply #4 03/30/09  8:46am
    You use these compressed pellets they sell just about everywhere around here, in the stove, instead of wood. They only vent these at house level, not above, like a chimney, so the fumes stay around pretty low. I've heard of several people being sickened by pellet stoves. I personally hate them. It smells like plastic burning.
  • Reply #5 03/30/09  2:22pm
    From www.hometips.com article on stove pellets: "These actually are recycled sawdust, wood shavings, corn, walnut and peanut shells, and similar biomass wastes that are ground up, compressed, and extruded."

    Sounds like they are made of pretty much anything that will burn. In the accompaning photo the look like the kitty litter we use, lol. My guess is they are a pelletized version of the Duraflame "logs" that smell like somebody's garbage burning. They are easy to use, clean to handle, light easily, and burn well so they are great indoors where the fireplace is, but outside they stink to high heaven.

    A big downside I see to pellet stoves, other than the stinky and possibly toxic/allergenic exhaust, is they don't work if the power goes out. So here comes the big cold, an ice storm hits, power lines go down, and there is no heat available.

    I'll take an old fashioned woodstove over a "high-efficiency" pellet contraption any day. I've been in the extended-power-outage-from-an-ice-storm before and we had heat and a way to cook food for the 4 days it took to get the lines back up.

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