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Advice:
How easily is it to get pregnant with PCOS?
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I have PCOS. I have a period maybe once or twice a year. I am not on any medications or drugs except for prozac.

I had a normal period about 3 months ago that lasted 3 days. Before that, it had been almost 8 months since my last one.

The doctor did give me provera which did cause me to have a period but I do not understand what the purpose was.

I'm really clueless and confused, no one has explained to me what this is or where it comes from or how this is going to affect me having children.

If I have unprotected sex, can I still become pregnant?
Will fertility treatments still be required to have a pregnancy?
Will the baby be sick and deformed and have diseases?
What does it mean that I have rare periods? That my body only produces an egg once or twice a year?
What can I do to fix this? To be normal? Aside from not having a period and being clueless about how sex works when you don't have a period, I do have facial hair, acanthosis nigricans, and had insulin resistance. My testosterone is higher than normal and my estrogen is lower than normal.

I want to have a baby one day. But I'm worried that I won't be able to.
Posted on 02/19/12, 04:38 pm
10 Replies Add Your Advice
Reminder: This is a support group for Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). We trust you will do your best to remain positive and helpful. For more information, see our rules of the road.

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Advice:
Email me when others reply to this topic help
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Reply #1 - 02/21/12  10:03pm
" Many women with PCOS also have beautiful, healthy babies. I'm currently 27 weeks pregnant with twins. If you have unprotected sex, there is a chance you could become pregnant because you aren't able to predict when exactly you ovulate. You only have a period when you ovulate and don't become pregnant. Given the information you've provided, I'm wondering if you've talked to your doctor about Metformin? It's a medication typically prescribed for insulin resistance, and many women have had success losing weight and getting more frequent periods. When the time comes where you want to have a baby, you may need to try some other medications like Clomid to help stimulate ovulation if you still aren't getting regular periods. If Clomid doesn't work, you may want to consider more invasive options luch as IVF. Your doctor will be able to help you figure out what options are best for you. "
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Reply #2 - 02/26/12  5:53pm
" I fell pregnant naturally with PCOS, all I was taking at the time was some natural herbs! Unfortunately i m/c but it is possible to get preggers with PCOS. I am about to start my 2nd round of Clomid. I will be doing 100mg this time. I had all the signs of ovulation this cycle but my progesterone levels suggested I didn't ovulate :( I am excited that it may work this time but also scared cause of the higher risk for twins lol. "
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Reply #3 - 03/20/12  3:34pm
" Many women use Provera to induce a cycle when they are trying to conceive. Some doctors think that your system just needs to be reminded to have a cycle, so after a few months of taking Provera, you cycles might come regularly without any help.

Having PCOS doesn't mean you can't have children. Some women struggle, but there is still hope!

Yes, you can still get pregnant if you have unprotected sex.

Some women with PCOS require fertility treatments, but many do not.

You can still have healthy babies.

Here is some information I found about rare/ irregular periods.

In order to understand what causes women with PCOS to have irregular periods we need to establish the association between the ovary and the uterus. The ovary produces the hormones (estrogen and progesterone) which are responsible for developing the inside lining of the uterus - called the endometrium. It is the job of the endometrium to respond to these hormones in a fashion that will allow for a pregnancy to develop within the uterus if fertilization of an egg occurs. In order for the endometrium to respond correctly to the ovarian hormones the ovary must produce these hormones in a very organized fashion. The very important process of ovulation maintains this organization.

The ovaries of women with PCOS do not ovulate (release an egg) on a regular basis. Therefore, the hormones produced by these ovaries are not made in the organized fashion that the endometrium requires. The result of this disorganized hormone production is seen by the woman with PCOS as irregular menstrual periods. Commonly, when the woman with PCOS has a rare period they can be very heavy.
What can I do to fix this? To beside from not having a period and being clueless about how sex works when you don't have a period, I do have facial hair, acanthosis nigricans, and had insulin resistance. My testosterone is higher than normal and my estrogen is lower than normal.

It's totally normal to worry about being able to have a baby, but I hope you know that it is still possible. Keep asking your doctor questions.

I agree with Ayreish,, many women with PCOS find success with Metformin and Clomid.

Good luck to you. I'm here if you need to talk. "
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Reply #4 - 03/23/12  8:37pm
" Provera ok see how that is highlighted. click it and read more, it will kill your egg or keep it from forming completely it is a birth control and does have an effect for months after just like depo premavera (sp?)
I am just saying this because I am also in your shoes, it is realeiving to find someone with exactly the same thing that i am going through,
I also have PCOS.
I also only have a period maybe once or twice a year.
It has been almost 11 months since my last one.
I am ttc
and I have just found out I have it
, from what I have heard from others on this site is you need to find a fertillity endocrincolgist he will answer all of your questions with your PCOS and your reproductive challenges..
I wish you the best! "
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Reply #5 - 03/23/12  10:15pm
" I dont agree with Provera being a birth control. My doctor started me on Provera and I got my period after 2 days, my doctor said this was probably just luck as your period doesnt usually start until you are done with the provera. But doctor is the associate professor of the infertility clinic and research center at USF. I am 100% confident in him...and he wouldnt put me on a med that isnt going to help this process. The point is, its suppose to bring on your period, if you arent getting your period you are not ovulating and thats a problem. Thats the point of provera. "
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Reply #6 - 03/24/12  3:26am
" LIKE I SAID
Click on the link that says provera
then read... it says it prevent the egg from devoloping..... Nothing cn be misunderstood, Provera makes you start your period! yes, but it doesn't devolop an egg........... READ IT!! "
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Reply #7 - 03/24/12  3:36am
" Members Success
Polycystic Ovarian Synd...
542 85%
Endometriosis
311 50%
Menopause
38 71%
Infertility
25 92%
Trying To Conceive
8 88%

Provera
Description-
Progestins are hormones.
The low-dose progestins for contraception are used to prevent pregnancy. Other names for progestin-only oral contraceptives are minipills and progestin-only pills (POPs). Progestins can prevent fertilization by preventing a woman's egg from fully developing.

Also, progestins cause changes at the opening of the uterus, such as thickening of the cervical mucus. This makes it hard for the partner's sperm to reach the egg. The fertilization of the woman's egg with her partner's sperm is less likely to occur while she is taking, receiving, or using a progestin, but it can occur. Even so, the progestins make it harder for the fertilized egg to become attached to the walls of the uterus, making it difficult to become pregnant.

No contraceptive method is 100 percent effective. Studies show that fewer than 1 of each 100 women become pregnant during the first year of use when correctly receiving the injection on time or receiving the levonorgestrel implants. Fewer than 10 of each 100 women correctly taking progestins by mouth for contraception become pregnant during the first year of use. Methods that do not work as well include using condoms, diaphragms, or spermicides. Discuss with your health care professional what your options are for birth control.

Progestin contraceptives are available only with your doctor's prescription.

Make certain your health care professional knows if you are on any special diet, such as a low-sodium or low-sugar diet. "
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Reply #8 - 03/24/12  4:06pm
" Hi Ladies.

Provera, Prometrium,Crinone and birth control pills are all various forms of progesterone, so I thought. I've used Provera and Prometrium to induce a period. I used Crinone gel to help maintain my pregnancy. I always wondered how you could take progesterone to maintain a pregnancy and also use it for birth control.

Below are two websites that help answer this question.

http://www.ovulation-calculator.com... (This website offers information about how progesterone helps promote fertility and the survival of the fertilized egg).

http://contraception.about.com/od/h... ( This article explains the role of progestin and estrogen in birth control pills).

From my understanding, you need a LH surge to ovulate. When you take birth control pills, estrogen and progestin are timely released to prevent that surge from occuring.

I also did some more digging online. Basically, progesterone and progestins are not the same. Some medicines have natural progesterone and other have synthetic progesterone (progestin). Here's what I found.

Progesterone vs. Progestins

Synthetic progesterone (normally referred to as progestins) are drugs which are manufactured by drug companies. Synthetic progestins are totally unnatural. The drug companies have altered the molecular structure of progesterone at unusual positions in order to make their new creations patent able. Since synthetic progestins are not natural to the body they can cause a host of side effects.

Hope you all find this helpful. It helped me as I was considering continuing to use Provera. "
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Reply #9 - 03/27/12  8:27pm
" Thank you Shawnie for being helpful. To the other lady who needs to learn how to be respectful. Chill out. I am a nurse also, not an idiot. My problem was completely different, I wasnt getting a period. That is why my doctor used it. I am ovulating we recently found out. I dont need to go on or defend myself to you. This is why I rarely come on this site. "
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Reply #10 - 03/28/12  11:52am
" Wow I wasn't being disrespectful, if anything i was going out of my way to help you... take it as you want. I dont care "

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