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Physical & Emotional Abuse Information

  • Abuse is a general term for the treatment of someone that causes some kind of harm (to the abused person, to the abusers themselves, or to someone else) that is unlawful or wrongful. Physical abuse is abuse involving contact intended to cause pain, injury, or other physical suffering or harm. Psychological abuse or emotional abuse refers to the humiliation or intimidation of another person, but is also used to refer to the long-term effects of emotional shock...
  • Psychological abuse can take the form of physical intimidation, a means to control others through scare tactics and oppression. It is often associated with situations of power imbalance often found in abusive relationships and child abuse relationships; however, it can also take place on larger scales, such as group psychological abuse, racial oppression, and bigotry. A more "mild" case might be that of workplace abuse. Workplace abuse is a large cause of workplace-related stress, which in turn can cause both physical and mental illness (such as battered women syndrome)..

    There need not be an agitator for psychological abuse to occur; one can undergo self-abuse, as in the case of someone who is depressive, or self-mutilating.

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Health Blogs

Abuse is not always physical. It can also be psychological or financial abuse. It is not always a male perpetrator and a female victim.
Posted in Depression by Doctor Oz on Jul 03, 2014
We still don't know for sure. Prolactin could be a key. This major hormone increases with stress and is associated with crying. Levels of prolactin in the body correlate positively with frequency of emotional crying. A tantalizing bit of evidence? As a whole, women cry more often than men (perhaps four times as often, according to one study), and ... Read More »
Yes, they can. Traditionally, men in North America, at least, have been raised to see themselves as providers, protectors, leaders and pillars of the community. Since WWII and women's entry into the labor force that perspective has slowly been eroded.

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