Advertisement




More DailyStrength
Health Event Calendar
See what's new on the site
Step-by-step Tutorials
How to use DailyStrength
We're on Facebook
Check out our page
Follow us on Twitter
Read our tweets
Get Cool DS Stuff!!!!!
Shirts, Hats, Baby Wear

Epilepsy & Seizures Information

  • Epilepsy (often referred to as a seizure disorder) is a chronic neurological condition characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. The condition is named from the Greek epilepsis ("to take a firm grip on"). It is commonly controlled with medication, although surgical methods are used as well. Seizures (or convulsions) are temporary abnormal electrophysiologic phenomena of the brain, resulting in abnormal synchronization of electrical neuronal activity. They can manifest as an alteration in mental state, tonic or clonic movements and various other symptoms. They are due to temporary abnormal electrical activity of a group of brain cells. The medical syndrome of recurrent, unprovoked seizures is termed epilepsy...
  • Epilepsy is usually treated with medication prescribed by a physician; primary caregivers, neurologists, and neurosurgeons all frequently care for people with epilepsy. In some cases the implantation of a stimulator of the vagus nerve, or a special diet can be helpful. Neurosurgical operations for epilepsy can be palliative, reducing the frequency or severity of seizures; or, in some patients, an operation can be curative.

    Some medications can be taken daily in order to prevent seizures altogether or reduce the frequency of their occurrence. These are termed "anticonvulsant" or "antiepileptic" drugs (sometimes AEDs). All such drugs have side effects which are idiosyncratic and others which are dose-dependent; it is not possible to predict who will suffer from side effects or at what dose the side effects will appear.

    Some people with epilepsy will experience a complete remission when treated with an anticonvulsant medication. If this does not occur, the dose of medication may be increased, or another medication may be added to the first. The general strategy is to increase the medication dose until either the seizures are controlled, or until dose-limiting side effects appear; at which point the medication dose is reduced to the highest amount that did not produce undesirable side effects.

    Serum levels of AEDs can be checked to determine medication compliance and to assess the effects of drug-drug interactions; serum levels are generally not useful to predict anticonvulsant efficacy in an individual patient, though in some cases (such as a seizure flurry) it can be useful to know if the level is very high or very low.

    If a person's epilepsy cannot be brought under control after adequate trials of two different drugs, that person's epilepsy is generally said to be 'medically refractory.'

  • Click to expand

View Top Epilepsy and Seizures Answers at sharecare.com

Health Blogs

I’m sure many of you have heard my rants about the direction our health care system is going. You’ve heard my concerns of the number of children who are under-insured or who have no insurance here in the U.S. Solutions are complicated, and financial resources are more than limited, when state and federal cutbacks are mentioned each and every ... Read More »
Surprise! As a Physician in California the statement in support of marijuana by the California Medical Association (CMA,) the first state medical association to do so was a little bit of a shock. The California Medical Association yesterday urged legalization and regulation of medical cannabis to allow for wider clinical research. The ... Read More »
Modern medicine has revolutionized our quality of life. Many people with debilitating diseases are now able to live normal lives with daily medication. But what happens if that medication has a serious side effect on fertility, or on the health of a developing fetus? Let’s take Depakote for example. This drug is used to control seizures, ... Read More »

Member Photos

Advertisement

Latest Activity