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Topics Replies Last Post
TBI friend 
2 By iAMhappyIswear
11/26/14
TBI and the immune system 
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Disability Benefits 
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hi i think i migth join 
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so confused all the time 
4 By anita926
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I need to know Now! 
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Brain Injury Information

  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI), traumatic injuries to the brain, also called intracranial injury, or simply head injury, occurs when a sudden trauma causes brain damage. TBI can result from a closed head injury or a penetrating head injury and is one of two subsets of acquired brain injury (ABI). The other subset is non-traumatic brain injury (i.e. stroke, meningitis, anoxia)...
  • Parts of the brain that can be damaged include the cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum, and brain stem (see brain damage). Symptoms of a TBI can be mild, moderate, or severe, depending on the extent of the damage to the brain. Outcome can be anything from complete recovery to permanent disability or death. A coma can also affect a child's brain.

    The damage from TBI can be focal, confined to one area of the brain, or diffuse, involving more than one area of the brain. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with concussion (a shaking of the brain in response to sudden motion of the head), diffuse axonal injury, or coma. Localized injuries may be associated with neurobehavioral manifestations, hemiparesis or other focal neurologic deficits.

    Types of focal brain injury include bruising of brain tissue called a contusion and intracranial hemorrhage or hematoma, heavy bleeding in the skull. Hemorrhage, due to rupture of a blood vessel in the head, can be extra-axial, meaning it occurs within the skull but outside of the brain, or intra-axial, occurring within the brain. Extra-axial hemorrhages can be further divided into subdural hematoma, epidural hematoma, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. An epidural hematoma involves bleeding into the area between the skull and the dura. With a subdural hematoma, bleeding is confined to the area between the dura and the arachnoid membrane. A subarachnoid hemorrhage involves bleeding into the space between the surface of the brain and the arachnoid membrane that lies just above the surface of the brain, usually resulting from a tear in a blood vessel on the surface of the brain. Bleeding within the brain itself is called an intracerebral hematoma. Intra-axial bleeds are further divided into intraparenchymal hemorrhage which occurs within the brain tissue itself and intraventricular hemorrhage which occurs into the ventricular system.

    TBI can result from a closed head injury or a penetrating head injury. A closed injury occurs when the head suddenly and violently hits an object but the object does not break through the skull. A penetrating injury occurs when an object pierces the skull and enters brain tissue.

  • Click to expand

View Top Brain Injury Answers at sharecare.com

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Developing regular brain-healthy habits is a critical piece in boosting your brain and unleashing its power. You must take your habits seriously, and put habits into your life that serve you, rather than steal from you. Through the years I have come up with an incredibly simple way to boost brain health. It really takes just three ... Read More »
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I can’t tell you how great it is to see the amount of research and attention concussions are getting these days. From the professional leagues we watch on the television to the recreational sport leagues our children play in, there now exist guidelines that better guide us on when athletes (both young and old) may return to the playing field ... Read More »

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